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Search results “In memory table oracle” for the 2015
Table Compression Enhancement in Oracle Database 11g R2
 
05:00
Table Compression: Overview Oracle Database supports three methods of table compression: 1.Basic table compression 2.OLTP table compression Oracle Corporation recommends to compress all data to reduce storage costs. The Oracle database can use table compression to eliminate duplicate values in a data block. For tables with highly redundant data, compression saves disk space and reduces memory use in the database buffer cache. Table compression is transparent to database applications. The table_compression clause is valid only for heap-organized tables. The COMPRESS keyword enables table compression. The NOCOMPRESS keyword disables table compression. NOCOMPRESS is the default. With basic compression, the Oracle database compresses data at the time of performing bulk load using operations such as direct loads or CREATE TABLE AS SELECT. With COMPRESS FOR OLTP, the Oracle database compresses data during all DML operations on the table.
Views: 2355 Saurabh Joshi
Oracle Database Tutorial 63 : Introduction to Tablespace In Oracle Database
 
04:26
Introduction to tablespace in oracle database consist Brief intro of tablepsace, type of tablespace, Big and small file tablespace, intro of Data files in oracle By manish sharma RebellionRider ------------------------------------------------------------------------ ►►►LINKS◄◄◄ Blog : http://bit.ly/tablespace-introduction-rebellionrider Previous Tutorial ► Indexes https://youtu.be/F5NrQYD4a9g ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►►►Help Me In Getting A Job◄◄◄ ►Help Me In Getting A Good Job By Connecting With Me on My LinkedIn and Endorsing My Skills. All My Contact Info is Down Below. You Can Also Refer Me To Your Company Thanks ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Copy Cloud referral link || Use this link to join copy cloud and get 20GB of free storage https://copy.com?r=kb4rc1 -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►Make sure you SUBSCRIBE and be the 1st one to see my videos! -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Amazon Wishlist: http://bit.ly/wishlist-amazon ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ►►►Find me on Social Media◄◄◄ Follow What I am up to as it happens on https://twitter.com/rebellionrider https://www.facebook.com/imthebhardwaj http://instagram.com/rebellionrider https://plus.google.com/+Rebellionrider http://in.linkedin.com/in/mannbhardwaj/ http://rebellionrider.tumblr.com/ http://www.pinterest.com/rebellionrider/ You can also Email me at for E-mail address please check About section Please please LIKE and SHARE my videos it makes me happy. Thanks for liking, commenting, sharing and watching more of our videos This is Manish from RebellionRider.com ♥ I LOVE ALL MY VIEWERS AND SUBSCRIBERS
Views: 34974 Manish Sharma
PL/SQL: Mutating Triggers Part-1
 
06:24
In this tutorial, you'll learn... PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 23839 radhikaravikumar
Heap Tables and Index Organized Tables in Oracle | Chris Saxon
 
02:55
Chris Saxon, a database evangelist, developer advocate, and SQL specialist with Oracle, uses up his two minutes with a tip on using heap tables and index organized tables in Oracle Database.
SQL: Delete Vs Truncate Vs Drop
 
08:27
In this tutorial, you'll learn the difference between delete/drop and truncate. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 64479 radhikaravikumar
1.ORACLE WORLD - How to Performing Flashback in Oracle Database
 
05:04
Hello friends in this video i'm just showing to you that how to enable flashback in Oracle database... #PerformingFlashback #OracleDatabase By Lalit saini
Views: 1910 Oracle World
oracle world - Row Level Lock in Oracle database
 
14:21
Hello friends in this video we learn how the lock occur in database automatically when multiple user modified the same transaction in their session. #RowLevelLock Oracle database Unbeatable,Unbreakable Platform..
Views: 7105 Oracle World
SQLPLUS: LineSize & PageSize
 
03:49
In this tutorial, you'll learn how to set linesize and pagesize . PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 16906 radhikaravikumar
What is? - Advanced Compression in Oracle Database 12c
 
05:10
Join Kevin Jernigan, as he talks about Advanced Compression in Oracle Database 12c. How it optimizes and makes I/O reads more efficient and increases throughput. ================================= For more information, see http://www.oracle.com/goto/oll Copyright © 2015 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Oracle World - How to perform RMAN Recovery Block Corruption
 
13:11
Let us look at a test case where we corrupt from blocks in a particular datafile and then use the RMAN blockrecover command to recover the corrupted data blocks. #performRMANRecovery #BlockCorruption
Views: 3441 Oracle World
creating tablespace in oracle 12c
 
01:44
As Oracle has evolved, the options for creating tablespaces have grown more complex, with more CREATE TABLESPACE options: You create tablespaces with the CREATE TABLESPACE command. Before you create the tablespace you should decide: 1. How big you wish the tablespace to be. 2. Where you want to put the datafile or datafiles that will be associated with that tablespace. 3. What you want to call the tablespace and the datafiles. We recommend that you include the following in the datafile name when you create the tablespace: 1. The name of the database 2. The name of the tablespace 3. A number that makes the datafile unique So, for a tablespace called USERS assigned to a database called BOOKTST we would have a datafile called booktst_users_01.dbf. Here is an example of creating such a tablespace using the create tablespace command: Note that we used 50m to indicate that we wanted to create the tablespace 50 Megabytes in size. You can also use the K symbol for Kilobytes, and the G symbol for Gigabytes. If you want to try to use the P symbol for a 50 Petabyte tablespace, we want to talk to you! There are several "create tablespace" options that determine how big the tablespace will be: Autoextend on: Creating a tablespace with autoextend on alleviates the potential problem of a database outage if the tablespace reaches maximum extents. You create a tablespace using autoextend with the autoextend on option. Using "create tablespace . . . autoextend on" will push the point of failure to the OS filesystem, which is good because you never want you database to hang because a tablespace cannot grow. With autoextend on, you only need to monitor the free space in the filesystem directory. Maxsize: This is the maximum size that the datafile can grow. We recommend creating a tablespace with maxsize unlimited to prevent a lock-up. Size: This is the size of the underlying data file for the tablespace. Blocksize: Specifying a larger blocksize will not result in a larger tablespace. See here on creating tablespaces with non-default blocksizes. Uniform size: This specifies the size that the data file will grow when it needs to extend. By default, an Oracle tablespace will not grow if it runs out of space. If you use up all your space, you are just out of luck unless you use the autoextend keyword to indicate that the tablespace may grow, on it?s own, dynamically. Here is an example of creating a tablespace that is set to autoextend:
Views: 4989 Mohammad Taseen
Oracle Database In-Memory & The Optimizer - DBIM Workshop part 4
 
47:07
Oracle Database In-Memory introduces a new in-memory only columnar format and a new set of SQL execution optimizations such as SIMD processing, column elimination, storage indexes and In-Memory aggregation. The Oracle Optimizer is fully aware of the new In-Memory functionality and has adapted its cost model to allow existing query workloads to take full advantage of in-memory columnar tables. This 45 minute session provides an overview of what has changed with the Optimizer, shows how to understand the new execution plans, and explains how query workloads benefit from in-memory.
Heap tables
 
21:48
Views: 1309 Nikolay Savvinov
PL/SQL: Mutating Triggers Part-2
 
08:41
In this tutorial, you'll learn... PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 14274 radhikaravikumar
Oracle Database In-Memory Configuration, Population & Querying - DBIM workshop part2
 
48:02
Underlying Oracle Database In-Memory is a unique in-memory dual format that avoids the trade-offs inherent in single-format databases and enables both superfast analytics and online transaction processing (OLTP). This session explains how the In-Memory column is allocated, when and how data is populated into it, and provides details on the key performance enhancing features that come with it including in-memory data compression, scans, joins aggregations and storage indexes. We will also demonstrate how to monitor and manage the In-Memory column store via new v$ performance views and data dictionary tables.
Efficient Function Calls From SQL (Part 5) : Pipelined Table Functions
 
03:48
The fifth part of a mini-series of videos showing how you can improve the performance of function calls from SQL. In this episode, we compare the performance of conventions table functions with pipelined table functions. For more information see: https://oracle-base.com/articles/misc/pipelined-table-functions https://oracle-base.com/articles/misc/efficient-function-calls-from-sql Website: https://oracle-base.com Blog: https://oracle-base.com/blog Twitter: https://twitter.com/oraclebase Cameo by Mike Dietrich : Blog: https://blogs.oracle.com/UPGRADE Twitter: https://twitter.com/MikeDietrichDE Cameo appearances are for fun, not an endorsement of the content of this video.
Views: 11527 ORACLE-BASE.com
How to use partitioning to improve performance of large tables
 
42:49
In this video we cover in much more detail the improvement in performance that can be achieved by using partitioning. MS SQL server databases can scale well using this feature. We cover how partitioning a table gives similar performance as a single table with a clustered index, we then explore how adding NC index improve performance of the heap table as well as the partitioned table.
Views: 18369 Jayanth Kurup
Migrating SQL Server Databases to In-Memory OLTP with AMR, Part 1
 
07:02
Discover more at logicalread.solarwinds.com/. In Part 1 of this two-part video, learn how to assess a potential migration of SQL Server databases to In-memory OLTP using the Analysis Migrate Report (AMR) tool, including how to set up the Management Data Warehouse, and run the database collection and transaction performance analysis. Connect with SolarWinds: thwack Community: http://thwack.solarwinds.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SolarWinds Twitter: https://twitter.com/solarwinds Google+: https://plus.google.com/+solarwinds/ LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/solarwinds Instagram: http://instagram.com/solarwindsinc/ Vine: https://vine.co/SolarWinds Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/solarwinds_inc/
Views: 2348 solarwindsinc
Oracle Exadata
 
00:30
Oracle Exadata is software and hardware engineered together to provide the highest-performing and most-available platform for running Oracle Database. Its architecture features a scale-out design with industry-standard servers and intelligent storage, including state-of-the-art flash technology, and a high-speed InfiniBand internal fabric. Elastic configurations enable systems tailored to specific database workloads. Powerful 2- or 8-socket database servers, intelligent storage, ultra-fast PCI Flash cards, and unified Infiniband connectivity Specifically optimized for DBaS and Oracle Database in-memory, including exclusive in-memory fault tolerance, where processing continues even with a database server fault. Extreme Flash all-flash storage option Provides Oracle Database optimized all-flash performance for all transactions and queries. Provides isolation for consolidated workloads that need hard limits on CPU/memory or independent admin/OS, and can be used to manage licensing DB options and other software by virtual machine. Size your Oracle Exadata environment to your needs and expand as your requirements grow, with configurations starting at 1/8 rack and growing through multi rack sizes. Total Oracle Database Compatibility Oracle Exadata supports standard Oracle Database 11g and 12c software, including all database options and Oracle best practices. This means the entire Oracle Database ecosystem, including applications, tools and DBA knowledge, is immediately usable on Oracle Exadata. Use Oracle Exadata for enterprise data warehouse and your most demanding OLTP system, including in-memory workloads, DBaaS, and consolidation or mixed workloads. Large System Memory Capacity-With up to 12 TB Oracle Exadata Smart Scan-Data-intensive workloads, such as reports and data warehouse queries are offloaded to Oracle Exadata intelligent storage server software running in Oracle Exadata storage, boosting performance and return on investment. Oracle Exadata storage hierarchy of DRAM, Flash, and disk automatically migrates data to ensure the best performance and the lowest storage cost. Reduce the size of data warehousing tables by up to 10x, and archival tables by up to 50x, through the industry’s best compression technology. For more Information - www.hipl.co.in
DML Processing in an Oracle Database -  DBArch Video 8
 
09:07
This video explains the steps involved in processing a DML statement in an Oracle Database Server. Our Upcoming Online Course Schedule is available in the url below https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1qKpKf32Zn_SSvbeDblv2UCjvtHIS1ad2_VXHh2m08yY/edit#gid=0 Reach us at [email protected]
Views: 52768 Ramkumar Swaminathan
Creative Oracle Redo Maneuvers - Seminar Intro
 
09:46
Creative Oracle Redo Maneuvers teaches you how to push Oracle redo throughput to the absolute limit! There are a number of unusual and powerful maneuvers Oracle DBAs can do to reduce commit times, reduce log file sync and log file parallel write wait times. In a nutshell, improve performance when the system is bogged down with redo related issues. This seminar goes deep. Memory architecture and redo processing is explored through creative experimentation, statistical analysis and operating system tracing Oracle processes. It's a fascinating journey that every Oracle DBAs should take. Join Oracle ACE Director Craig Shallahamer as he explores how Oracle's redo processing actually works and how you can use this knowledge to maximize Oracle performance and increase your value as an Oracle DBA. What you are watching in the seminar Introduction. For details go to http://www.orapub.com/video-seminar-creative-redo-maneuvers What You Will Learn - How Oracle redo processing and flow works - The key memory structures and how to fit together - What is the log file sync wait event and why it is feared - How multiple Oracle 12c LGWRs work together - How to creatively use Oracle's "commit write" facility - Creatively using Oracle's ability to change OS process priorities Modules 1. Memory and process redo related architectures 2. Things Change... Always 3. Drilling Into Oracle 12c Multiple LGWRs 4. Breaking The Rules With The "Commit Write" Facility 5. Understanding When Commit Write Shines 6. Changing LGWR OS Priority. Yes! For more information on OraPub, go to www.orapub.com
Views: 506 OraPub, Inc.
Creating Tables Without Segments
 
04:52
Understand Deferred Segment Creation Beginning with Oracle Database 11g Release 2, when you create heap-organized tables in a locally managed tablespace, the database defers table segment creation until the first row is inserted. In addition, segment creation is deferred for any LOB columns of the table, any indexes created implicitly as part of table creation, and any indexes subsequently explicitly created on the table. The advantages of this space allocation method are the following: 1.It saves a significant amount of disk space in applications that create hundreds or thousands of tables upon installation, many of which might never be populated. 2.It reduces application installation time.
Views: 300 Saurabh Joshi
Benefits of Common Table Expressions
 
05:56
On this episode of Joes 2 Pros SQL server unlocked series we present a topic for anyone who has ever been exposed to SQL Server, Common Table Expressions. A CTE is memory resident table. You are pulling from that query and giving it a name. This table adds enhancements to the old tables. It allows you to open up to new people without having an increased security risk. This is extremely beneficial for anyone who is exposed to SQL Server as keeping your content safe is a top concern for most organizations. In this video, he will take you through a very real example from a department store quarterly reporting. He wants to do a seasonal reporting from all the departments of a store excluding snow sports and cooking. He shows you how to make the code more simple and reduce human error. Having CTE knowledge will be greatly beneficial to you in your everyday career. Please be sure to follow along our blog series. Stay tuned next week to learn more about Dynamic SQL. To learn more about he benefits of common table expressions view our course Developer 2012 Volume 2 Video 10.1. See more at: http://www.joes2pros.com/joes2pros/courses Full Blog: http://joes2prosblog.social27.com/
MNG7: PL/SQL Runtime Memory Management (PL/SQL Channel)
 
26:19
Explore the different kinds of memory used by Oracle generally and the PL/SQL runtime engine specifically, including the SGA (System Global Area), PGA (Process Global Area) and UGA (User Global Area). The video also offers techniques for analyzing memory consumption by your programs. This video was taken from PLSQLChannel.com, originally recorded before Steven Feuerstein re-joined Oracle in March 2014. ======================================== Practically Perfect PL/SQL with Steven Feuerstein Copyright © 2015 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Oracle 11g Performance Tuning Demo Session
 
44:46
More Oracle DBA Courses: https://oraclegenesis.com/ Online trainings: https://oraclegenesis.com/video-courses/ Fly me a trainer: https://oraclegenesis.com/fly-me-a-trainer/ DBA Knowledgebase: https://oraclegenesis.com/dba-knowledgebase/ ORACLEGENESIS provides all you need to build and manage effective Oracle technology learning. We designed ORACLEGENESIS as a simple to use yet powerful online Oracle learning system for students. Each of our courses is taught by an expert instructor, and every course is available on demand.
Views: 82049 DBA Genesis
PL/SQL: Cursors using FOR loop
 
05:10
In this tutorial, you'll learn h.ow to write a cursor using for loop and the advantage of it. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 17595 radhikaravikumar
Oracle Database Storage Structure
 
06:37
In this video i'm going to describe Oracle Storage Structure, how to store Data in Database if it is useful for you so please like my video and subscribe my channel and if you want to give any suggestions to please write in comment box.
Views: 2955 OCP Technology
Oracle Exadata :Heuristics Informatics Pvt. Ltd
 
00:46
Oracle Exadata is software and hardware engineered together to provide the highest-performing and most-available platform for running Oracle Database. Its architecture features a scale-out design with industry-standard servers and intelligent storage, including state-of-the-art flash technology, and a high-speed InfiniBand internal fabric. Elastic configurations enable systems tailored to specific database workloads. Powerful 2- or 8-socket database servers, intelligent storage, ultra-fast PCI Flash cards, and unified Infiniband connectivity Specifically optimized for DBaS and Oracle Database in-memory, including exclusive in-memory fault tolerance, where processing continues even with a database server fault. Extreme Flash all-flash storage option Provides Oracle Database optimized all-flash performance for all transactions and queries. Provides isolation for consolidated workloads that need hard limits on CPU/memory or independent admin/OS, and can be used to manage licensing DB options and other software by virtual machine. Size your Oracle Exadata environment to your needs and expand as your requirements grow, with configurations starting at 1/8 rack and growing through multi rack sizes. Total Oracle Database Compatibility Oracle Exadata supports standard Oracle Database 11g and 12c software, including all database options and Oracle best practices. This means the entire Oracle Database ecosystem, including applications, tools and DBA knowledge, is immediately usable on Oracle Exadata. Use Oracle Exadata for enterprise data warehouse and your most demanding OLTP system, including in-memory workloads, DBaaS, and consolidation or mixed workloads. Large System Memory Capacity-With up to 12 TB Oracle Exadata Smart Scan-Data-intensive workloads, such as reports and data warehouse queries are offloaded to Oracle Exadata intelligent storage server software running in Oracle Exadata storage, boosting performance and return on investment. Oracle Exadata storage hierarchy of DRAM, Flash, and disk automatically migrates data to ensure the best performance and the lowest storage cost. Reduce the size of data warehousing tables by up to 10x, and archival tables by up to 50x, through the industry’s best compression technology. For more Information - www.hipl.co.in
SQL: Sequence Generator
 
04:41
In this tutorial, you'll learn how to make use of sequence generator. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 7977 radhikaravikumar
SQL: Default Constraint
 
04:17
In this tutorial, you'll learn how to make use of default constraint PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 5779 radhikaravikumar
PL/SQL: Dynamic SQL part-2
 
05:14
In this tutorial, you'll learn what is dynamic SQL and how to implement it.. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database.
Views: 17239 radhikaravikumar
Differences between Shared and Exclusive Lock in oracle database
 
09:31
Hello friends in this video we learn how the lock occur in database automatically when multiple user modified the same transaction in their session. #SharedandExclusiveLock Oracle database Unbeatable,Unbreakable Platform..
Views: 10158 Oracle World
How to Install Oracle! !! Database Training
 
01:50
For Complete Database Training Details Visit: http://www.qaonlinetraining.com http://infotek-solutions.com/ Delivery Method: Instructor led classroom and Online Training supported by world class Learning management system which automate all flow of lectures, videos, assignments, forums, quizzes and interview process. Class Schedule: Week-ends and Weekdays Contact Us: 571-437-0652, Mail Us: [email protected] Training Locations at : Ashburn / Fairfax / Maryland Office Address: 12801 Worldgate Dr #500, Herndon, VA 20170 Overview of Oracle DBA Training Oracle as a flexible, complex & robust RDBMS The evolution of hardware and the relation to Oracle Different DBA job roles (VP of DBA, developer DBA, production DBA, database babysitter) The changing job role of the Oracle DBA Environment management (network, CPU, disk and RAM) Instance management (managing SGA regions) Oracle table and index management Instance Architecture Instance vs. database Components of an instance Creating the OFA file structure ($DBA, bdump, udump, pfile) Oracle Instance Internals SGA vs. PGA Background processes Interfaces with server and disk I/O subsystem Using SQL*Plus for DBA management Connecting and executing SQL Using the “as sysdba” syntax Overview of SQL*Plus DBA commands (startup, etc.) Control file, UNDO and REDO management Explaining the use of control files Listing the Contents of the control File File locations for control Files Obtaining Control File Information Listing control file contents Displaying and Creating Undo segments Altering Undo Segments Determining the Number and Size of Undo segments Understanding flashback technology Troubleshooting Undo – snapshot too old Redo log concepts for recovery Online redo log (log_buffer) online redo logs and archived redo logs Oracle ARCH and LGWR background processes Redo log dictionary queries Redo log switch frequency and performance Multiplexing the Online Redo Log Files Archiving the Oracle Redo Logs Recovery using the redo log files User and privilege management The three security methods (VPD, Grant security/role-based security, grant execute) Creating New Database Users Using pre-spawned Oracle connections Auditing User activity Identifying System and Object Privileges Granting and Revoking Privileges Creating and Modifying Roles Displaying user security Information from the Data Dictionary Overview of instance management Parameter files (init.ora, listener.ora, tnsnames.ora) Rules for sizing SGA components Automated Oracle memory management (AMM) Initialization file management Creating the init.ora file Using spfile Displaying init.ora values with v$parameter Oracle*Net configuration Creating the listener.ora file Creating the tnsnames.ora file Data buffer configuration & sizing Inside the Oracle data buffers Using the KEEP pool Monitoring buffer effectiveness Using multiple blocksizes (multiple buffer pools) Shared pool and PGA configuration & Sizing Shared pool concepts and components Understanding the library cache Relieving shared pool contention Overview of PGA for sorting and hash joins Using sort_area_size, hash_area_size and pga_aggregate_target Troubleshooting network connectivity Verifying network connectivity with ping and tnsping Testing database links Oracle tables, views and materialized views Types of Oracle tables (regular, IOT, sorted hash clusters, nested tables) Oracle Views Oracle materialized views Oracle indexes Types of Oracle indexes (b-tree, bitmap, bitmap join index) Creating B*-Tree, bitmap and function-based Indexes Function-based indexes Finding indexing opportunities Index maintenance Oracle constraints Costs & benefits of constraints Types of Oracle indexes constraints (check, not null, unique, PK, FK) Cascading constraints Schema, File & tablespace management Describing the relationship between data files, tablespaces and table Understanding Oracle segments Creating Tablespaces – using the autoextend option Changing the Size of Tablespaces – alter database datafile command Defining a TEMP tablespace Changing the default storage Settings for a tablespace Review of the storage parameters in DBA views (ASM, ASSM, pctfree, pctused and freelists). Monitoring Chained rows (fetch continued rows) Monitoring Insert and Update performance (pctused, APPEND) Database Maintenance Reason for reorgs – chained rows, imbalanced freelists Reorganizing Tables using Export and Import Using CTAS to reorganize data Index rebuilding Backup & Recovery overview (hot & cold Backups, RMAN, block change tracking) Oracle DBA Utilities Data pump (Imp and exp utilities) SQL*Loader LogMiner Flashback DataGuard Oracle DBA utilities – Oracle dbms packages (dbms_redefinition)
SQL: Check Constraint
 
05:11
In this tutorial, you'll learn how to make use of check constraint. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 12289 radhikaravikumar
SQL: Change User Password
 
02:38
In this tutorial, you'll learn how to change user password in sql plus PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 8212 radhikaravikumar
High Performance Bulk Data Loading
 
33:55
What is the best way to get data into an Oracle database? This session covers how to bulk load data quickly into an Oracle database. It will help developers avoid common gotchas that will limit performance, and it gives insight into how to make sure the solution will be database AND DBA-friendly! Example SQL is used to demonstrate the solution, and links to working examples will be provided.
Oracle Database 12c: Simplifying Effective Date Range Queries with Temporal Validity
 
14:23
Fewer mistakes, less typing - in 12c you can define effective date ranges for your table date columns. Chris Saxon provides a quick demo in this week's episode.
Expert Insights: "Oracle Net Troubleshooting for DBAs"
 
52:11
Watch "Oracle Net Troubleshooting for DBAs" with Pythian Principal Consultant, Oracle ACE and Oak Table Member, Jared Still. Discover more about Jared: http://www.pythian.com/experts/jared-still/
Views: 654 Pythian
SQL tutorial 61: SEQUENCE in Oracle Database By Manish Sharma RebellionRider
 
08:05
This tutorial is all about Sequence In Oracle Database. In this SQL Tutorial you will learn How to create a sequence How to populate a Primary key column (auto increment in Oracle) using Sequence How to drop a sequence ------------------------------------------------------------------------ ►►►LINKS◄◄◄ Blog : http://bit.ly/sql-sequence-in-oracle-database-rebellionrider-manish-sharma Previous Tutorial ► How To Insert Data into Table using SQL Developer http://youtu.be/YYQCSV6MzTk ► INSERT INTO Command http://youtu.be/uQXgqFtxI_k ► How to copy /Insert data into a table from another table http://youtu.be/m3Ep8tAMqok ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►►►Help Me In Getting A Job◄◄◄ ►Help Me In Getting A Good Job By Connecting With Me on My LinkedIn and Endorsing My Skills. All My Contact Info is Down Below. You Can Also Refer Me To Your Company Thanks ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Copy Cloud referral link || Use this link to join copy cloud and get 20GB of free storage https://copy.com?r=kb4rc1 -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►Make sure you SUBSCRIBE and be the 1st one to see my videos! -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Amazon Wishlist: http://bit.ly/wishlist-amazon ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ►►►Find me on Social Media◄◄◄ Follow What I am up to as it happens on https://twitter.com/rebellionrider https://www.facebook.com/imthebhardwaj http://instagram.com/rebellionrider https://plus.google.com/+Rebellionrider http://in.linkedin.com/in/mannbhardwaj/ http://rebellionrider.tumblr.com/ http://www.pinterest.com/rebellionrider/ You can also Email me at for E-mail address please check About section Please please LIKE and SHARE my videos it makes me happy. Thanks for liking, commenting, sharing and watching more of our videos This is Manish from RebellionRider.com ♥ I LOVE ALL MY VIEWERS AND SUBSCRIBERS
Views: 42594 Manish Sharma
Oracle 12c Features Everyone Can Use
 
01:17:38
There are many new features available in Oracle 12c, but not everyone is using the Enterprise Edition of Oracle. Our Oracle expert will show you how to immediately take advantage of these great new features, regardless of the Oracle Database Edition you are using. He will also describe the new multi tenant architecture of 12c, and why you might want to use it even if you're not running a cloud environment. Presented by Arman Rawls, Senior Oracle Database Architect at Neovera. Learn more about Neovera's Oracle database services and expertise - https://www.neovera.com/content/database-services/oracle-dba-services/.
Views: 5411 Neovera
قواعد البيانات 2  (database buffer cache (Oracle DBA 11g Tutorial
 
21:42
database buffer cache in oracle 11g - Memory Structures - Overview of the System Global Area
Views: 787 Ahmed Ybat
BLK2: Get Data Faster with BULK COLLECT (PL/SQL Channel)
 
24:36
This lesson explores the BULK COLLECT feature, which allows you to retrieve multiple rows of data from the SQL layer with a single fetch. This video was taken from PLSQLChannel.com, originally recorded before Steven Feuerstein re-joined Oracle in March 2014. ======================================== Practically Perfect PL/SQL with Steven Feuerstein Copyright © 2015 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Oracle SQL Tutorial 1 - Intro to Oracle Database
 
10:18
As illustrated in the video, Oracle Database is a program designed to hold lots of information, or data. There are all kinds of different databases and they all have their uses. Some of the most common ones are MySQL, SQL Server, Sybase, and MongoDB. All of these have different uses. The differences will be easier to understand after you learn more about each kind of database. We did not discuss it much in the video, but if you are wondering what “SQL” means in the title, it stands for structured query language. Structured query language is a human readable computer language that is used to tell databases to do things. We will discuss SQL and Oracle SQL Developer more in future videos. Databases are better than spreadsheets because they allow multiple users at one time, different levels of access given to users, recovery options and transactions, and it is more protected from hacking and malicious destruction. Programming languages often have very useful functions or methods that can be used to communicate to a database and therefore they are a naturally good option for the back end of programs. This course will go over all of the major parts of database programming using Oracle SQL. We will be using Oracle 11g, but these videos should still work with other versions, including the most recent 12c. Q and A ~~~~~~ How much does Oracle cost? The full enterprise edition costs thousands. They have other versions for less and they even have a FREE VERSION! This is known as the XE version (eXpress Edition). That is the one we will be using. How long does it take to learn SQL? You can learn all of the basics and be an efficient beginner database developer in only about a month of practice. To become an intermediate it can take anywhere from an additional 3 - 6 months with a only a few hours of studying and practicing each day. How can I learn SQL faster? Take notes and actually mess around with making your own database. Watch these videos until you understand the concepts within them, read articles and books that teach in more depth. Enjoy this content? You might enjoy my programming videos. Pick one and have some fun! 🙂 Learn Javascript - http://bit.ly/JavaScriptPlaylist Learn Java - http://bit.ly/JavaPlaylist Learn C# - http://bit.ly/CSharpTutorialsPlaylist Learn C++ - http://bit.ly/CPlusPlusPlaylist Learn C - http://bit.ly/CTutorialsPlaylist Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. HELP ME! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry. Subscribe to my newsletter: http://bit.ly/JoinCCNewsletter ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://Twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - http://bit.ly/ccbluehost (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 327290 Caleb Curry
Database Oracle Compress
 
01:21
Ini merupakan cara kompresing database oracle, video ini dibuat oleh Rony Ihsan, salah satu senior Technical Advisor Database.
HVR Replication setup from Oracle into Oracle including ASM
 
11:14
Setup of real-time replication between 2 Oracle databases including ASM.
Views: 901 HVR
Introduction of the Oracle Database
 
06:40
Objectives List the features of Oracle Discuss the theoretical and physical aspects of a relational database Describe the Oracle implementation of RDBMS and ORDBMS Follow on twitter also @Abject_Composer Also Visit our Website : http://aklearningchannel.blogspot.in/ We also avaible on Facebook Page :https://www.facebook.com/aklearningchanneltutorial
Views: 239 Abject Composer
Powerful Oracle 12c SQL Features FREE Webinar
 
53:24
Themis instructor John Mullins presents Oracle 12c Features related to SQL development. Find John's presentation and more at http://www.themisinc.com/webinars
Views: 1102 Themis Education
PL/SQL: Stored Procedure Part-2
 
04:38
In this tutorial, you'll learn what is stored procedure. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 5741 radhikaravikumar