Home
Search results “Aral sea salt”
Aral Sea: The sea that dried up in 40 years - BBC News
 
05:47
Subscribe to BBC News www.youtube.com/bbcnews The disappearance of the Aral Sea in Central Asia is one of the world's greatest man-made disasters. In Kazakhstan, with the help of the World Bank, more than $80million have been spent trying to save the most northern part of the sea but this has only benefited a few hundred people. In this film, we speak to people still living in deserted fishing ports, to see how their lives have changed, and to find out whether they believe that they'll ever see the sea again. Subscribe to BBC News HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog Check out our website: http://www.bbc.com/news Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bbcworldnews Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bbcworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/bbcnews
Views: 821632 BBC News
It's Raining Salt: Toxic Aral Sea Storm Sparks Health Fears In Central Asia
 
02:48
It's Raining Salt: Toxic Aral Sea Storm Sparks Health Fears In Central Asia. Large parts of western Uzbekistan and northern Turkmenistan are recovering from a severe salt storm that has damaged agriculture and livestock herds. The three-day storm hit Uzbekistan's Karakalpaksta...
Views: 618 ASIA NEWS
The Dried up Aral Sea Eco-Disaster
 
09:31
http://www.furiousearth.com Explorer/adventurer George Kourounis visits the Aral Sea in western Uzbekistan where wasteful irrigation practices by the former Soviet Union have drained most of the water, creating a vast ecological disaster. Rusting fishing boats lie in the desert sands that used to be rich fishing grounds. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gkourounis/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/georgekourounis Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ExplorerGeorgeKourounis/ Filmed as part of the Angry Planet TV series. Produced by: www.peterrowe.tv
Views: 1749347 gkourounis
Aral Sea Catastrophe
 
05:11
Death of Aral Sea, winds rise and spread the bottom salt on hundreds of kilometers around. Aral a once-large saltwater lake straddling the boundary between Kazakstan to the north and Uzbekistan to the south. The shallow Aral Sea was formerly the world's fourth largest body of inland water. It nestles in the climatically inhospitable heart of Central Asia, to the east of the Caspian Sea. The Aral Sea is of great interest and increasing concern to scientists because of the remarkable shrinkage of its area and volume in the second half of the 20th century. This change is due primarily to the diversion (for purposes of irrigation) of the riverine waters of the Syr Darya and Amu Darya, which discharge into the Aral Sea and are its main sources of inflowing water. The sea's northern shore—high in some places, low in others—was indented by several large bays. The low-lying and irregular eastern shores were interrupted in the north by the huge delta of the Syr Darya and in the south were bordered by a wide tract of shallow water. The equally vast Amu Darya delta lay on the lake's southern shore, and along the lake's western periphery extended the almost unbroken eastern edge of the 820-foot- (250-metre-) high Ustyurt Plateau. Shrinkage of the Aral Sea, 1960--99.From about 1960 the Aral Sea's water level was systematically and drastically reduced because of the diversion of water from the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers for purposes of agricultural irrigation. As the Soviet government converted large acreages of pastures or untilled lands in Uzbekistan, Kazakstan, Turkmenistan, and elsewhere into irrigated farmlands by using the waters of the Amu Darya and Syr Darya, the amount of water from these rivers that reached the Aral Sea dropped accordingly. By the 1980s, during the summer months, the two great rivers virtually dried up before they reached the lake. The Aral Sea began to quickly shrink because of the evaporation of its now-unreplenished waters. By the late 1980s, the lake had lost more than half the volume of its water. The salt and mineral content of the lake rose drastically because of this, making the water unfit for drinking purposes and killing off the once-abundant supplies of sturgeon, carp, barbel, roach, and other fishes in the lake. The fishing industry along the Aral Sea was thus virtually destroyed. The ports of Aral in the northeast and Mŭynoq in the south were now many miles from the lake's shore. A partial depopulation of the areas along the lake's former shoreline ensued. The contraction of the Aral Sea also made the local climate noticeably harsher, with more extreme winter and summer temperatures. By 1989 the Aral Sea had receded to form two separate parts, the "Greater Sea" in the south and the "Lesser Sea" in the north, each of which had a salinity almost triple that of the sea in the 1950s. In the late 1990s an island in the Aral Sea, Vozrozhdenya, became the centre of environmental concern. This was of special concern because Vozrozhdenya had been a testing ground for Soviet biological weapons during the Cold War. In addition to testing done there on such agents as tularemia and the bubonic plague, hundreds of tons of live anthrax bacteria were buried on the island in the 1980s. In 1999 still-living anthrax spores were discovered on the site, and scientists feared that when the island was no longer surrounded by water, land vertebrates could carry anthrax to populated areas. Other environmental problems plagued the region as well. By the end of the century the Aral had receded into three separate lakes. The level of the sea had dropped to 125 feet (36 metres) above sea level, and the water volume was reduced by 75 percent of what it had been in 1960. Almost no water from the Amu Darya and the Syr Darya reached the sea, and, unless drastic action were taken, it seemed likely that the Aral Sea could disappear within 20 to 30 years, leaving a large desert in its place. The health costs to people living in the area were beginning to emerge. Hardest hit were the Karakalpaks, who live in the southern portion of the region. Exposed seabeds led to dust storms that blew across the region, carrying a toxic dust contaminated with salt, fertilizer, and pesticides. Health problems occurred at unusually high rates—from throat cancers to anemia and kidney diseases. Infant mortality in the region was among the highest in the world.
Views: 170539 debashir
The Shrinking Aral Sea - Uzbekistan
 
13:24
July 2001 For 50 years Soviet leaders diverted the rivers which feed the sea to irrigate cotton. And when it became clear that the land wasn't suited for the thirsty crop the planners simply increased the use of hazardous chemicals. "It is the world's largest man- made environmental disaster", says Ian Small for Medecins Sans Frontiers in Uzbekistan. The charity usually operates in war zones, but for the first time it has now set up a project devoted solely to an environmental catastrophe. The war here is against tuberculosis, kidney disease and cancers - plaguing the people of the region. Some are caused by toxins, some by the high levels of salt in the water. "Almost nothing grows and it's hard for people -- salt concentrates in their joints and they can't walk for a long time...", says Aigali Tankimalov who sailed the Aral Sea for 29 years. Now the wreck of the vessel he commanded in the navy sits opposite his front door -- and the nearest water is 100 kilometres away. The last of the 20 or so species of fish that lived in the Aral Sea died out in the 1980s, the victims of an environmental catastrophe. Yet despite the dramatic evidence of environmental destruction, Uzbekistan's new leaders continue to grow cotton and scientist fear the damage is irreparable. Produced by ABC Australia Distributed by Journeyman Pictures
Views: 63792 Journeyman Pictures
Great Salt Lake drying up as plans to punch hole through causeway are delayed
 
02:28
The drying up of the Great Salt Lake is beginning to have significant economic consequences, and that seems to have stirred up a hint of turbulence among the lake's varied stakeholders. Science and nature specialist John Hollenhorst reports. Aired 10/19/16 at 10 p.m.
Views: 640444 KSL News
The evaporating Mediterranean Sea | BBC
 
02:36
New David Attenborough series Dynasties coming soon! Watch the first trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWI1eCbksdE --~-- Six million years ago the continents of Africa and Europe collided to close the Strait of Gibralter. Starved of water, the Mediterranean Sea evaporated to form a vast desert. The legacy of this vanished ocean? A million years' worth of salt deposited in mines half a kilimetre beneath the island of Sicily. Extraordinary footage taken from the ground-breaking BBC series Earth: The Power of the Planet. Visit http://www.bbcearth.com for all the latest animal news and wildlife videos and watch more high quality videos on the new BBC Earth YouTube channel here: http://www.youtube.com/bbcearth
Views: 394974 BBC Earth
Should This Lake Exist?
 
07:16
The Salton Sea is the largest body of water in California, home to the second most diverse group of birds in America and it exists by accident. Another great video on the Salton Sea: https://youtu.be/otIU6Py4K_A I used archive from this video. Music by Kevin MacLeod, www.incompetech.com ‘Mirage’, ‘Hyperfun’, ‘Marty Gots a Plan’, ‘Past the Edge’
Views: 3292051 Veritasium
How Did A Sea Disappear?
 
01:39
The Aral Sea, once the world’s fourth largest lake, has almost disappeared in just 40 years. Situated between southern Kazakhstan and northern Uzbekistan, this salt lake was dealt a devastating blow in the mid 20th century when the soviet government controlled this region. In an effort to create farmland by irrigating the surrounding desert regions, the soviets diverted two vital rivers that fed into the Aral Sea, but diverting these rivers deprived the lake of crucial water sources. The area’s once-thriving fishing communities watched as their livelihood dried up. A few years into the 21st century, just 10% of the sea remained. Today entire generations have no recollection of its former glory but there is hope. In 2005 the World Bank funded the construction of new dams, in an effort to save the lake. Thanks to this work, a small section of the sea has returned, and fishermen are once again able to bring in catches - albeit much smaller quantities. Despite this progress, there’s still a long way to go to transform what is still largely a desolate ship graveyard. Subscribe to Getty Images TV on YouTube: http://gtty.im/2r0Jgyx Like @gettyimages on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gettyimages Follow @gettyimages on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gettyimages Follow @gettyimages on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/gettyimages Check out more videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh4CvlC9Su53xwWDJ5P6WqA
Views: 3227 Getty Images TV
Shrinking Aral Sea (2000-2011) [3D converted]
 
00:13
In the 1960s, the Soviet Union undertook major water diversion projects on the Syr Darya and Amu Darya rivers, capturing water that once fed into the Aral Sea. Irrigation projects made the desert bloom, but they spelled doom for the natural freshwater lake. As the Aral Sea dried up, fisheries collapsed, as did the communities that depended on them. The remaining water supply became increasingly salty and polluted with runoff from agricultural plots. Dust blowing from the exposed lakebed eventually degraded the soils, forcing further water diversion efforts to revive them. On a larger scale, loss of the Aral Sea's water influenced regional climate, making the winters even colder and the summers much hotter. Fifty years later, the lake is virtually gone. View the dramatic changes that took place over decades in this collection of satellite images. credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (Aral Sea abandoned boats photograph courtesy of Ismael Alonso, © 2011) source: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?10862
Views: 5763 djxatlanta
The Dead Sea is drying up at an alarming rate
 
01:21
The Dead Sea has already lost more than one third of its surface area over the years. The water level is currently dropping by over 1 meter every year and its shoreline is expected to drop from 411 meters to 430 meters below sea level by 2020, according to the environmentalist group EcoPeace Middle East. Traditionally, the Jordan River is the Dead Sea’s inflow source. However, 50 years ago it was diverted to supply cities, reducing the water inflow level to the Dead Sea to just 5% of its original volume. The hot and dry climate of the region makes it difficult for the Dead Sea to restore itself. That added to the rapid loss of water has resulted in the increased salinity of the lake. The group also points out that the Dead Sea is threatened by cosmetic companies that extract mineral water from the region to make beauty products. Hotels and attractions built along the shoreline also release untreated sewage into the Dead Sea. Even though the Dead Sea does not have any wildlife in itself, the region around it is known for supporting several endangered species such as ibexes, leopards and the indigenous Dead Sea Sparrow. ----------------------------------------­­---------------------------------------­-­---------------- Next Animation Studio’s News Direct service provides daily, high-quality, informative 3D news animations that fill in for missing footage and help viewers understand breaking news stories or in-depth features on science, technology, and health. Sign up for a free trial of News Direct's news animations at http://newsdirect.nextanimation.com.tw/Reuters.aspx To subscribe to News Direct or for more info, please visit: http://newsdirect.nextanimation.com.tw/Index.aspx
Views: 268091 News Direct
Oriel Sea Salt
 
00:28
Views: 29 FoodEducators
Google Timelapse: Aral Sea
 
00:13
Timelapse is a global, zoomable video that lets you see how the Earth has changed over the past 32 years. Explore the world through time at https://earthengine.google.com/timelapse. Image credit: Landsat / Copernicus
Views: 1262847 Google Earth
99 invisible | A Sea Worth its Salt
 
16:44
PLEASE SUBSCRIBE MY CHANNEL AND LIKE VIDEO THANKKK! 99% Invisible | 224 A Sea Worth its Salt The largest body of water in California was formed by a mistake. In 1905, the California Development Company accidentally flooded a huge depression in the Sonora Desert, creating an enormous salty lake called the Salton Sea. The water is about … LISTEN TO THE 99 invisible https://goo.gl/Wf1soU ► Friend Us On FACEBOOK: https://goo.gl/LYsGEc ► Follow Us On TWITTER: https://goo.gl/K1qJ4g ► SUBSCRIBE to 99 invisible: https://goo.gl/Wf1soU PLEASE
Views: 101 99 invisible
Central Asia's second-largest lake under threat - 23 Aug 09
 
02:24
It is Central Asia's second largest lake and home to more than three million people, but Kazakhstan's Lake Balkash is under threat. The desert-locked sea is shrinking due to over-irrigation, caused in part by industrial neighbours such as China. Many are concerned it could suffer the same fate as the Aral Sea, and eventually disappear. Al Jazeera's Robin Forestier-Walker travelled with a team of scientists to Lake Balkhash - to find out why history could be about to repeat itself.
Views: 6621 Al Jazeera English
The dead sea is dying 2018
 
04:52
save the dead sea the dead sea is dying
Views: 8856 Jamal Kewan
Shocking timelapse of the shrinking Aral Sea
 
00:27
NASA's latest video shows the world's once 4th largest lake shrinking steadily
Views: 2775 WION
Is the Dead Sea really dead?
 
04:58
Because of its extremely high salt content, no animal or plant life can survive in the Dead Sea. So why do tourists from around the world flock to bathe in its deep blue waters? Clarissa Ward takes us on a trip to this exotic and unique destination.
Views: 2059848 CBS Sunday Morning
Salt from Aral Sea covered full region
 
00:39
In october 14, 2018 there was strong fog with salt and dust in Karauzak region Republic of Karakalpakstan
Swimmers worth their salt cross shrinking Dead Sea
 
00:55
A group of swimmers braved the sting of extremely salty waters to cross the Dead Sea from Jordan to Israel on Tuesday, a seven-hour challenge that organisers described as a first.
Views: 3563 AFP news agency
Aral Sea - sandstorms and the fight against desertification | Tomorrow Today
 
04:42
The Aral Sea was once the world's fourth largest lake. But for decades the rivers that feed it have been diverted for irrigation. As a result, the huge body of water between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan has steadily shrunk and is now only 10 percent of its original volume. What remains is a desert of sand, salt and toxic dust containing pesticides, fertilizers and industrial chemicals.Sandstorms carry the dust to surrounding regions, causing widespread desertification and health problems for the local population. Scientists are searching for ways to halt this environmental catastrophe.
Views: 2381 DW News
Fishing After the Shrinking of the Aral Sea
 
02:21
via YouTube Capture
Views: 38 chloem635
NASA satellite images show Aral Sea basin 'completely dried'
 
01:32
An area of the Central Asian inland sea, once the fourth largest in the world, was left parched in August, according to Nasa photographs. The Aral Sea has been retreating over the last half-century since a massive Soviet irrigation project diverted water from the rivers that fed it into farmland. Images taken from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on Nasa's Terra satellite. euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.
Views: 21248 euronews Knowledge
World of Change: the Shrinking Aral Sea
 
02:11
The Aral Sea was once the fourth-largest lake in the world. Fed primarily by snowmelt and precipitation flowing down from faraway mountains, it was a temperate oasis in an arid region. But in the 1960s, the Soviet Union diverted two major rivers to irrigate farmland, cutting off the inland sea from its source. The Aral Sea has been slowly disappearing ever since. These images show how the Aral Sea and its surrounding landscape has changed over the past few decades. For more details about these images, read the full stories here: + World of Change: Padma River https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/world-of-change/aral_sea.php + The Aral Sea, Before the Streams Ran Dry https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/77193/the-aral-sea-before-the-streams-ran-dry +North Aral Sea Recovery https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/7645/north-aral-sea-recovery +The Aral Sea Loses Its Eastern Lobe https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/84437/the-aral-sea-loses-its-eastern-lobe +New Water in the Aral Sea https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/90857/new-water-in-the-aral-sea +Shrinking Aral Sea https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/a010800/a010862/index.html Producer: Kasha Patel Images by: Jesse Allen, Lauren Dauphin, Robert Simmon, and Joshua Stevens, Music: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music
Views: 11010 NASAEarthObservatory
Как человек уничтожил Аральское море(Death of the Aral sea)
 
02:16
Аральское море — бессточное солёное озеро в Средней Азии, на границе Казахстана и Узбекистана. С 1960-х годов XX века уровень моря (и объём воды в нём) быстро снижается вследствие забора воды из основных питающих рек Амударья и Сырдарья. До начала обмеления Аральское море было четвёртым по величине озером в мире. Чрезмерный забор воды для полива сельскохозяйственных угодий превратил четвертое в мире по величине озеро-море, прежде богатое жизнью, в бесплодную пустыню. То, что происходит с Аральским морем -- настоящая экологическая катастрофа, вина за которую лежит на Советской власти. В настоящий момент высыхающее Аральское море ушло на 100 км от своей прежней береговой линии возле города Муйнак в Узбекистане -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Aral sea - salt lake in Central Asia, bordering Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Since the 1960s of the XX century the sea level (and the amount of water in it) is declining rapidly due to diversion of water from the main feeder rivers Amudarya and Syrdarya. Prior to the shallowing of the Aral sea was the fourth largest lake in the world. Excessive withdrawal of water for irrigation of agricultural land has transformed the world's fourth largest lake-sea, first of rich life in a barren desert. What happens with the Aral sea -- real ecological catastrophe, the blame for which lies with the Soviet power. Currently drying up the Aral sea went on 100 km from their previous coastline near the town of Muynak in Uzbekistan
Aral sea-Сержан Бауржанов
 
01:11
Aral sea(Russian аральское море)(kazakh Арал теңізі)
Views: 2108 Serzhan Bauirzhanov
Who Killed the Aral Sea - Stories Jump from Maps
 
11:59
One of the great human-made environmental disasters. If the speaking speed is too slow, try speeding up the video to 1.5 times. Other environmental crises triggered by large powers: USA prevents Colorado river from flowing to Mexico International beef industry leads to Amazon deforestation Chinese super-projects in Myanmar threaten to flood local communities Overfishing of offshore Somalia by large companies depletes catch for locals Powerful companies or gangs of illegal loggers murder indigenous people in Peru, Ecuador References: Columbia University http://www.columbia.edu/~tmt2120/introduction.htm Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aral_Sea BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-a0c4856e-1019-4937-96fd-8714d70a48f7 karakalpak.com http://www.karakalpak.com/stanaral.html The Medieval Aral Sea Crisis http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=18963696 NY Times http://www.nytimes.com/2002/12/09/world/grand-soviet-scheme-for-sharing-water-in-central-asia-is-foundering.html?pagewanted=1 Lakes by size http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_lakes_by_volume http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_lakes_by_area Salinity http://www.unep.org/geo/geo1/fig/fig2-2_1.htm Image credits: "Timur Empire" by Stuntelaar - Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Timur_Empire.jpg#/media/File:Timur_Empire.jpg Satellite comparisons http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:AralSea1989_2014.jpg "AralShip" by Staecker - Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:AralShip.jpg#/media/File:AralShip.jpg "Moynaq Aral-Sea Ships" by Sebastian Kluger - Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Moynaq_Aral-Sea_Ships.jpg#/media/File:Moynaq_Aral-Sea_Ships.jpg from Mr Hicks46 1. Some old fishing boats in Moynaq, Aral Sea, Uzbekistan. https://www.flickr.com/photos/teosaurio/9121875591/in/photostream/ 2. Salt lake somewhere between Atyrau and Beyneu, Kazakhstan. https://www.flickr.com/photos/teosaurio/9043328743/in/photostream/ 3. Uzbekistan Sums. https://www.flickr.com/photos/teosaurio/9124119296/in/photostream/ Aral Sea (lost again) https://www.flickr.com/photos/lamerie/8004308630/ Smaltz, Jeff. “Dust Storm over the Aral Sea : Natural Hazards.” Dust Storm over the Aral Sea: Natural Hazards. NASA GSFC, n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2014. http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=19853 - See more at: http://intlpollution.commons.gc.cuny.edu/aral-sea-catastrophe/#sthash.bIOuqCM2.dpuf PEYROUSE, SEBASTIEN. “Building a New Silk Road? Central Asia in the New World Order | Origins: Current Events in Historical Perspective.” Osu.edu. Ohio State University, July 2009. Web. 18 Dec. 2014. http://origins.osu.edu/article/building-new-silk-road-central-asia-new-world-order - See more at: http://intlpollution.commons.gc.cuny.edu/aral-sea-catastrophe/#sthash.bIOuqCM2.dpuf "Syr Darya River Floodplain, Kazakhstan, Central Asia" by ISS Expedition 25 crew - NASA Earth Observatory. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Syr_Darya_River_Floodplain,_Kazakhstan,_Central_Asia.JPG#/media/File:Syr_Darya_River_Floodplain,_Kazakhstan,_Central_Asia.JPG "Amudaryamap" by Background layer attributed to DEMIS Mapserver, map created by Shannon1 - Background and river course data from http://www2.demis.nl/mapserver/mapper.asp. Licensed under GFDL via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Amudaryamap.jpg#/media/File:Amudaryamap.jpg Don't buy Uzbek cotton Photo by: environmental justice foundation - See more at: http://newint.org/columns/currents/2009/07/01/uzbekistan/#sthash.NuVIpAK7.dpuf http://newint.org/columns/currents/2009/07/01/uzbekistan/ Girl harvesting cotton in Kashkadarya, Uzbekistan, October 2011 (Anti-Slavery International) http://treehugginghoolah.blogspot.jp/2012/12/cotton-slavery-and-peter-lilley.html © Global Warming Images / WWF http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/how_we_work/businesses/transforming_markets/solutions/better_management_practices/ Sept. 1–3, 1977, Landsat 2 (path/row 172–174/27–30) — Aral Sea mosaic http://earthshots.usgs.gov/earthshots/node/46#ad-image-0 "Sassanian Empire 621 A.D" by Keeby101 - I used Photoshop, cropped the image, drew the borders, coloered the map and labeled all of the cities.. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sassanian_Empire_621_A.D.jpg#/media/File:Sassanian_Empire_621_A.D.jpg "Artemia salina 4" by © Hans Hillewaert. Licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Artemia_salina_4.jpg#/media/File:Artemia_salina_4.jpg Created and presented by Michael Henshaw
Views: 6820 Taoist Bacon
Project Mongolia Pt 7 - Uzbekistan, Aral Sea - aventyrsrally.se
 
01:34
Part 7 - Uzbekistan and the Aral Sea Aral Sea: Covered with salt and toxic chemicals due to weapons testing. Agent orange sprayed the fields of cotton and the irrigation canals drained parts of the sea. A sad story for a lot of children who had cancer from birth and fishermen without fish. A trip from Sweden to Mongolia for SOS Children´s Villages Pictures, new projects and more material at: Website: http://www.aventyrsrally.se/ Blogg: http://aventyrsrally.wordpress.com/
Views: 326 aventyrsrally.se
Analyzing the shrinking Aral Sea
 
03:24
Analyzing the shrinking Aral Sea, using Landsat imagery in the Esri Change Matters viewer - an ArcGIS Online web mapping application. The classic geography study - some gained, some lost. Why is this an important issue for the region and globally?
Views: 459 geographyuberalles
How Does An Entire Sea Virtually Vanish? (2001)
 
13:18
The Shrinking Aral Sea (2001) - Diversion of rivers to feed cotton plantations has led Uzbekistan's Aral Sea to all but disappear - with disastrous consequences for those living nearby. Subscribe to Journeyman here: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures For 50 years Soviet leaders diverted the rivers which feed the sea to irrigate cotton. And when it became clear that the land wasn't suited for the thirsty crop the planners simply increased the use of hazardous chemicals. "It is the world's largest man- made environmental disaster", says Ian Small for Medecins Sans Frontieres in Uzbekistan. The charity usually operates in war zones, but for the first time it has now set up a project devoted solely to an environmental catastrophe. The war here is against tuberculosis, kidney disease and cancers which plague the people of the region. Some are caused by toxins, some by the high levels of salt in the water. All could have been avoided. For more information, visit https://www.journeyman.tv/film/1036 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanpictures Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JourneymanNews https://twitter.com/JourneymanVOD Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/journeymanpictures ABC Australia – Ref. 1036
Views: 5378 Journeyman Pictures
Aral Sea 4k Drone Footage
 
06:46
In this video you'll get a close up of the new oil rig that has just been planted in the Aral Sea. From one environmental disaster to another? Share the post with someone who might be interested! Thank you! Click the link below to make a donation via PayPal to support my work: PayPal.me/AhsanA Click the link below to book a photography coaching session with me: www.stilljourneying.com Click the link below to get my Kindle eBook: http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01AF70KKM?keywords=ahsan%20abbas&qid=1458377383&ref_=sr_1_1&sr=8-1 Click the link below to read my FREE eBook: http://www.stilljourneying.com/photography-ebook/ You can access more content on how to improve your photography for free on my blog at www.stilljourneying.com/blog Find out how you can accelerate your photography with his Home Study Course: http://www.stilljourneying.com/home-s... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/still.journe... Twitter: @sjourneying Periscope: @sjourneying Instagram: @sjourneying Live the moment!
Views: 15484 Ahsan Abbas
World Landbridge (8) - The Aral Sea Project
 
02:36
South of the Trans-Siberian Railway lies the Central Asian Desert, where vast transformations in the vein of NAWAPA are ripe for implementation. The project to revive the Aral Sea, which was proposed back in the 1940s by the Russian engineer Davydov, has been developed further since that time, and has recently been reactivated by Presidents Medvedev of Russia and Nazarbayev of Kazachstan. The Aral Sea has shrunken dramatically since the 1960s and 70s, when, for the purposes of water-intensive, Soviet-planned cotton crops, water from the rivers Amu and Syr Darya was diverted in large amounts. The sea has been drying up at an accelerating rate. This has led to the destruction of fishery in the region, and a landstrip of about 80 to 300km around the sea has seen a massive retreat of rainfall and the advent of salt storms. The potential solution to this condition lies many kilometers to the north, in the Altai mountains, where, at the border between Russia, Kazakhstan, China and Mongolia, the rivers Ob and Irtysh originate.
Aral Sea  time lapse
 
00:47
Aral Sea time lapse Aral Sea shrinking timelapse, 33 year evolution of the Aral sea dying out - satellite timelapse Don't click this link! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHoPoCsxxeMBDH_r5UfbqVQ?sub_confirmation=1 This timelapse shows the changes of the driying Aral sea in Russia If you have any suggestions to cover phenomena visible from space pls let me know. Aral Sea Basin, Aral Sea, Timelapse, Aral, Aralsea, Arallake, Lake, Aral Lake, Aral sea disaster, Aral sea 2018, The Aral Sea Crisis, shrinking All the images are from Google Earth
Views: 12326 Satellite timelapse
Aral Sea disaster
 
12:41
Prepared by: Tleuzhan Sharipullayev Sanzhar Amanzholov Nurbolat Gabassov Danen Dossaibek
Aral sea Dried up cause of Global Warming  सूख गया दुनिया का चौथा सबसे बडा सागर
 
04:34
global warming this video is about how a 4th number largest sea dried in 50 years this is because global warming lots of tragedies are happening jus because of global warming Aral sea is direct example of it. When Soviet Union made a Project plan for the water of Aral sea they just diverted the rivers which watering to Aral Sea and then started the dried story of Aral Sea We have to understand about Global Warming. How much we are paying for the pollution?We have just to take action about it, Otherwise our Planet is not safe to live earlier. Since 2006, the Aral sea -- the formerly huge body of water between Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan -- has shrunk dramatically.  According to NationalGeographic.com, the eastern part has lost a whopping 80 percent of its water in the short time.  The Aral Sea, before and after (UH.edu) In addition, over the past three decades 60 percent of the water in the lake has disappeared, because farmers back in the 1960s changed the course of two rivers that were flowing into it in order to water crops.  First the sea split into two lakes: the Large Aral Sea and the Small Aral Sea. By 2000, the Large Aral Sea had split again into two bodies. The salt concentration in the water became much higher, and the local fishing industry could no longer survive.  Experts say the southernmost part of the lake could soon disappear forever. please check out my other videos- 1 zika virus https://youtu.be/Qq8weapgPDA 2 magical mooving land real https://youtu.be/LRj3VdzD4k4 3 best inspirational story for students https://youtu.be/9RftH11RYIM 4 aral sea dried up https://youtu.be/5fzXPNpKx74 5 get attension back of your child in study https://youtu.be/mJwbMdJRzWw
Views: 653 Ufy
Earth Engine Timelapse Dead Sea
 
00:21
After observing the recorded images, we note that the flow of water drained into the Dead Sea decreases from one year to the next.
Views: 856 Géo Tech
Lake Became Desert Within Thirty Years..
 
01:37
The Aral Sea is situated in Central Asia, between the Southern part of Kazakhstan and Northern Uzbekistan. Up until the third quarter of the 20th century it was the world?s fourth largest saline lake, and contained 10grams of salt per liter. The two rivers that feed it are the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers, respectively reaching the Sea through the South and the North. The Soviet government decided in the 1960s to divert those rivers so that they could irrigate the desert region surrounding the Sea in order to favor agriculture rather than supply the Aral Sea basin. The reason why we decided to explore the implications up to today of this human alteration of the environment is precisely that certain characteristics of the region, from its geography to its population growth, account for dramatic consequences since the canals have been dug. Those consequences range from unexpected climate feedbacks to public health issues, affecting the lives of millions of people in and out of the region. By establishing a program to promote agriculture and especially that of cotton, Soviet government led by Khrouchtchev in the 1950s deliberately deprived the Aral Sea of its two main sources of water income, which almost immediately led to less water arriving to the sea. Not only was all this water being diverted into canals at the expense of the Aral Sea supply, but the majority of it was being soaked up by the desert and blatantly wasted (between 25% and 75% of it, depending on the time period). The water level in the Aral Sea started drastically decreasing from the 1960s onward. In normal conditions, the Aral Sea gets approximately one fifth of its water supply through rainfall, while the rest is delivered to it by the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers. Evaporation causes the water level to decrease by the same amount that flows into the Sea, making it sustainable as long as inflow is equal to evaporation on average. Therefore the diversion of rivers is at the origin of the imbalance that caused the sea to slowly desiccate over the last 4 decades. Level of salinity rose from approximately 10g/l to often more than 100g/l in the remaining Southern Aral. Salinity of the rivers varies with place and time, as well as through the seasons. When going through the desert, rivers often collect some salt compounds residues in the ground that result in higher salinity, but may well be lowered again after going through irrigated lands. Dams also affect salinity, notably by reducing its variability with the seasons. Smaller lakes within the Aral Sea that have stopped being fed by river flows tend to have higher salinity due to evaporation, causing some or all fishes that either survived or had been reintroduced in the 1990s to die. Even re-watering those lakes does not compensate for the increased salinity over the years. In 1998, water level was down by 20m, with a total volume of 210km3 compared to 1,060km3 in 1960. Most of the changes in climate and landscape in the Aral Sea basin that we are about to explore are at the least indirect products of Human induced changes. While we must remember at all times that society is responsible for the crisis that has unfolded in and around the Aral, the point we want to make is that most of the actual changes that have afflicted the Sea since the 1960s are the result of our environment’s reaction to the stresses society has imposed on it. Thus, the difficulty lies as much in understanding the way climate and other natural systems function as in being capable of weighing the potential consequences of our actions before we undertake them. Risk assessment combined with scientific understanding should undercut our actions more efficiently; adding an ethical dimension to the equation remains more than welcome in addition to those more accessible and quantifiable factors, but is too fragile to be the centerpiece on which our decisions rely before we commit to large scale actions which can often, as we are about to see, engender even larger responses from our environment. -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "The Parents Must Be Watch This Video (Tamil)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3F7VA8cU43A -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 111 Madukkur Mohamed
The Salton Sea Is Shrinking And Exposing Toxic Dust | AJ+ Docs
 
09:59
Watch Our Latest Documentaries: http://ajplus.co/ajplusdocsnew California’s Salton Sea is disappearing, which could endanger wildlife and cause a public health disaster. Subscribe for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV3Nm3T-XAgVhKH9jT0ViRg?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ajplusenglish Download the AJ+ app at http://www.ajplus.net/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajplus
Views: 248000 AJ+
Once-massive Aral Sea Dries Up To Almost Nothing
 
00:34
The Aral Sea was once the world's fourth-largest lake. Now much of it is a vast toxic desert straddling the borders of Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, two former Soviet states in central Asia. In recently released images, NASA's Earth Observatory shows the extent of the lake's recession over the past 14 years. The damage reached its peak this year, when the eastern lobe of the South Aral Sea -- which actually was the center of the original lake -- dried up completely. http://rss.cnn.com/~r/rss/edition_asia/~3/cOkmcaAz5Ow/index.html http://www.wochit.com
Views: 1737 Wochit News
Ships Cemetery: Aral Sea Dead Zone of Poisoned Pollution
 
04:11
Once the world's fourth largest lake, Central Asia's Aral Sea is now famous for other reasons. With 90 percent of its water lost through Soviet Union irrigation projects, it's now little more than an environmental catastrophe. And as RT's Lindsay France reports, the sea's demise also poses a serious threat to people's health. RT on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/RTnews RT on Twitter: http://twitter.com/RT_com
Views: 186761 RT
Aral Sea Timelapse
 
01:09
Landsat imagery timelapse of the shrinking Aral Sea spanning 1985 to 2015.
Views: 869 CyanoMap
Aral Sea Crisis
 
04:46
The Aral Sea is situated in Central Asia, between the Southern part of Kazakhstan and Northern Uzbekistan. Up until the third quarter of the 20th century, the Aral Sea was the world’s fourth largest saline lake, and contained 10 grams of salt per litre. However, today it is one of the worst ecological disasters in history.
Views: 116 Ethan Nava
World trip 2017 - Uzbekistan - Aral sea - Human Disaster
 
00:41
A view from what was before a port near the aral sea
Views: 411 Xavier Marchal
Lake Aral 2
 
05:55
Views: 72 ActionDrain
The Aral Sea Disaster.
 
01:16
The Aral Sea is one of the World's worst man-made disasters to ever happen. But if we all try our best to help, we can fix all of the damage we have caused. The clock is ticking. and the time is almost up. The Increasingly salty water has plenty of fertilizers and pesticides in it, making the water unsafe to drink and the crusted salt from the dried parts of the lake is blowing into the fields, degenerating the soil. Now that most parts of the lake is dried up, people call it the Aral desert, due to the abandoned boats and the cracking, salt crusted ground. The Aral Sea is Surrounded by the mainlands, far away from the oceans and seas. The Aral Sea is a very valuable resource to the people because the Sea was in the mainlands. It was and still is very far away from any other seas and main bodies of water. So, it was the only source of water around in that region. So, if the people of Uzbekistan took away all of their only water source, It would be harder to find drinking water and bathing water and there wouldn’t be any more fish in the lake, since there wouldn’t be a lake at all. If this ecosystem disappeared, there would be a huge problem for all biotic factors and It wouldn’t benefit anyone in this situation. If we reduce the water taken out of the lake and leave it alone... The Sea will Eventually come back slowly, Fish will slowly come back Jobs on the water will be restored. Will take a very long time Agriculture will be paused and all food will be lost and everyone and everything will die Solution #3 It will take a long time to do but if we can find a faster way to restore water that would be better before we take the longer way. If we build a dam... A quicker way to get water back and is already working Prevents floods and large amounts of water from coming in Very Expensive Can stop wildlife from getting from one place to another Solution #2 It is a bit more on the expensive side but, it won’t take as long as just leaving it alone, and it will have faster results. But before we use all of this money, we should find a more cheaper and more efficient way. If Farmers would stop wasting so much water and we tax the water that everyone is using... Can raise money for further solutions Farmers might stop farming if expensive get too high People might Protest This is the most logical solution out of all. If we charge people for the water they are using, they will stop wasting so much and it will help the government raise money for other solutions they didn’t have enough money to do before. First, we should build a dam (which we have already have done in 2005), improve irrigation, find other natural pesticides and fertilizers that don’t harm the water and what’s in it, eventually get a majority of the water back, and then desalinate the water that has been contaminated by the fertilizers and pesticides that was there from earlier years. My plan is to add a price to the water the people are using so we are not using as much water as we were before, since people wouldn’t be wasting what they paid for, and the government would be raising money for other projects like desalination and improving irrigation. So, it would be a good solution since it can raise awareness of what is happening and is raising money to fix the problem. My plan is the most effective because it is not as complicated and expensive as building another dam or improving irrigation. Both of those solutions do work, but they both are very expensive to put together and they both require a lot of time to be investing too. So, it would be more logical to add a price to the water to raise funds for bigger projects and raise awareness around Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. Made with http://biteable.com
Views: 33 Romeo Norris
Swimming and running in the Aral Sea
 
01:10
July 2015 near Aralsk, Kazakhstan.
Views: 3436 Mika Perkiömäki

Hombre de vitruvius analysis essay
How to write a 5 paragraph research essay
Processes and procedures example essay
Spend time with family essay conclusion
Artist process essay topics